Why See a Pediatric Optometrist in Otsego or Minnetonka Today?

Your child’s wellness is important to you, and that means total wellness, eyesight included. Vision is the sense we rely upon most heavily, and it plays a huge role in learning, especially at the earliest ages. If you want to give your children the best chance of success, you need to get them regular pediatric eye exams.

Seeing a pediatric optometrist might seem like a chore for another day, but it shouldn’t. Believe it or not, vision disorders are the 4th most common disability in the United States, and as many as one in seven kindergarten-aged children may have an undiagnosed vision problem that could interfere with learning.

Moreover, children with ADHD have at least three times the incidence of treatable visual problems, and even kids who don’t pass vision screenings often don’t get the help they need to manage their condition. Plus, simple screenings that only include a letter chart are not comprehensive enough to catch more than 30 percent of vision problems, and even children who have passed screenings before may develop conditions such as lazy eye at any time.

Why Are Pediatric Eye Exams So Important?

Many children act out and give up on school not because they lack the intelligence or willingness to learn, but because they quite simply cannot see well enough to engage with the material. The letters may blur or jump around, making it impossible for kids to focus both mentally – and quite literally visually. That’s why pediatric eye exams are so important.

Some parents rely on the pediatric eye exams offered at schools on an annual or bi-annual basis, but that’s not enough. While school screenings are beneficial, because they can offer information, they are often incomplete. They may only test a few areas of vision, neglect aspects of poor vision such as color deficiencies or focusing, and miss more than 60 percent of children with eyesight problems. Clearly, those odds aren’t good enough for your child.

When to Get Kids’ Eye Exams and What to Expect

Kids’ eye exams shouldn’t be something you wait to do until your child tells you they can’t see very well. Kids are terrible reporters, and by waiting, you might miss something. Kids’ eye exams are short, painless and don’t require that your child be able to read, so neither you nor your child needs to fear the process. It’s recommended that you get eye exams at 6 months of age, at 2-3 years, before entering school (5-6 years) and every two years throughout the school years.

Come See a Children’s Eye Doctor in Minnesota Today

Ready to get the help your kiddo deserves? Come see a children’s eye doctor in Minnesota today. You can call (763) 241-1090 to reach us at either our Otsego or Minnetonka location, or request an appointment through our website. Don’t wait to give your child the gift of eyesight today.

Consider these alarming facts:

  • Vision disorders are the 4th most common disability in the United States.
  • A recent study found that one in seven kindergarten-aged children may have an undiagnosed vision problem that could interfere with learning.
  • Children with ADHD have at least three times the incidence of treatable visual problems when compared to children without ADHD.
  • Even children that fail a “simple vision screening” are at risk. According to the American Academy of Opthamology about 67% of children that fail do not receive follow-up care.
  • Screenings using a distance letter chart alone generally only detect about 30% of children that would fail a professional examination since this screening does not assess visual skills expected to affect learning.
  • Each year, 75,000 three year old children develop amblyopia (lazy eye) in the U.S. Amblyopia is the leading cause of vision loss between the ages of 20-70 years and is preventable and treatable with early detection.
  • Vision problems affect 1 in 20 preschoolers and 1 in 4 school-age children. Left untreated, the problems can worsen, lead to other serious problems and affect learning ability, personality and adjustment in school.

Don’t rely on your child to tell you that they have a vision problem. The best way to protect a child’s vision is through professional eye examinations beginning at 6 months of age, at 2-3 years, before entering school (5-6 years) and every two years throughout the school years.

It is important to understand that a Vision Screening at school or your pediatrician’s office should not replace a thorough Eye and Vision Examination by your optometrist. Vision screenings are a limited process, only testing one or two areas of vision. Vision is a much more complex process. A screening usually does not evaluate a child’s focusing ability and generally do not test for color deficiencies. Some studies have shown that Vision Screenings may miss up to 60% of children with vision problems!

With today’s technologies, a child does not have to know the alphabet or read to have his or her eyes examined. Our office will patiently work with your child to make the experience comfortable and fun. Our exams are typically kept to 30-45 minutes in length to avoid the “meltdown” that may occur if they were any longer. We work with you and your child to make a visit to the optometrist’s office one doctor visit they look forward to doing! Everything from our lobby to our exam room, and yes, even our “tickle drops” are designed with your child in mind. Call us at (763) 241-1090 or schedule an appointment today online.